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    We may syndicate the publicly available content of our community areas to unaffiliated third-party websites, using RSS or other technologies. The information you have shared in the community areas may be included in this syndication. We will use the personally-identifying information that you provide about others in order to provide the products or services that you have requested; for example, to enable us to send them your gifts or cards. Of course, journalists have got things wrong in the past — either by mistake or prejudice or sometimes by intent.

    So it would be a mistake to think this is a new phenomenon of the digital age. But what is new and significant is that today, rumours and lies are read just as widely as copper-bottomed facts — and often more widely, because they are wilder than reality and more exciting to share. The cynicism of this approach was expressed most nakedly by Neetzan Zimmerman, formerly employed by Gawker as a specialist in high-traffic viral stories. The increasing prevalence of this approach suggests that we are in the midst of a fundamental change in the values of journalism — a consumerist shift.

    LIES That Limit: Uncover the Truth of Who You Really Are | eBay

    But the trouble is that the business model of most digital news organisations is based around clicks. That used to go to news publishers. In the news feed on your phone, all stories look the same — whether they come from a credible source or not. And, increasingly, otherwise-credible sources are also publishing false, misleading, or deliberately outrageous stories. We should be careful not to dismiss anything with an appealing digital headline as clickbait — appealing headlines are a good thing, if they lead the reader to quality journalism, both serious and not.

    My belief is that what distinguishes good journalism from poor journalism is labour: the journalism that people value the most is that for which they can tell someone has put in a lot of work — where they can feel the effort that has been expended on their behalf, over tasks big or small, important or entertaining. It has meant we have found new ways to get stories — from our audience, from data, from social media. It has given us new ways to tell stories — with interactive technologies and now with virtual reality.

    It has given us new ways to distribute our journalism, to find new readers in surprising places; and it has given us new ways to engage with our audiences, opening ourselves up to challenge and debate. But while the possibilities for journalism have been strengthened by the digital developments of the last few years, the business model is under grave threat, because no matter how many clicks you get, it will never be enough. And if you charge readers to access your journalism you have a big challenge to persuade the digital consumer who is used to getting information for free to part with their cash.

    News publishers everywhere are seeing profits and revenue drop dramatically. If you want a stark illustration of the new realities of digital media, consider the first-quarter financial results announced by the New York Times and Facebook within a week of one another earlier this year. Many journalists have lost their jobs in the past decade. The number of journalists in the UK shrank by up to one-third between and ; US newsrooms declined by a similar amount between and Earlier this year, at the Guardian we announced that we would need to lose journalistic positions.

    In March, the Independent ceased existing as a print newspaper. Since , according to research by Press Gazette, the number of local newspapers in the UK has fallen by — again, not because of a problem with journalism, but because of a problem with funding it. But journalists losing their jobs is not simply a problem for journalists: it has a damaging impact on the entire culture. The public media would then cease to resist populist tendencies, and could no longer fulfil the function it should in the context of a democratic constitutional state.

    Perhaps, then, the focus of the news industry needs to turn to commercial innovation: how to rescue the funding of journalism, which is what is under threat. Journalism has seen dramatic innovation in the last two digital decades, but business models have not. T he impact on journalism of the crisis in the business model is that, in chasing down cheap clicks at the expense of accuracy and veracity, news organisations undermine the very reason they exist: to find things out and tell readers the truth — to report, report, report.

    Serious, public-interest journalism is demanding, and there is more of a need for it than ever. It helps keep the powerful honest; it helps people make sense of the world and their place in it.